container gardening

seed starting indoors

The Basics of Seed Starting

The Basics of Seed Starting 814 610 Eco Garden Systems

Planning is important when starting seeds. Get a head start on vegetable sardening season planning with these seed starting tips.

read more
notebook for vegetable garden plans

5 Important Things to Consider When Making Your Vegetable Garden Plans

5 Important Things to Consider When Making Your Vegetable Garden Plans 1000 668 Eco Garden Systems

Making vegetable garden plans isn’t hard, especially if you consider these 5 important things first! When the sun is shining on a cold winter day, it’s easy to close your eyes and imagine being in your garden again. Now that you’re thinking about getting back in the soil, how about making some vegetable garden plans? There’s no better winter activity if you love growing your own plants. In fact, once you have your vegetable garden plans in place, you can start your seedlings indoors – another excellent winter activity for gardeners – and move on to other things like doing an inventory of tools and supplies. Now, grab your graph paper and pencil (or, if you prefer, you can use the Eco Garden Systems Planner) and let’s get planning. Here are 5 important things to consider when making your vegetable garden plans: 1. Garden Size How big do you want your garden to be? If you have a lot of space, this leaves you with many size options. But maybe you have a smaller space and have to get more creative (an Eco Garden is perfect for smaller spaces – plus you can double the per square foot production). If you don’t have a lot of time, start with a smaller garden. You would be surprised at how much you can grow in a smaller space, especially when employing strategies like square foot gardening. 2. Garden Location Where will you put your garden? Some things to think about: Sun: Make sure your plants will get at least 8-10 hours of sunlight each day. Pick a day when you are at home and watch where the sun hits your yard the most; don’t forget to take notes and make it part of your garden plan. Water: Is your garden going to be…

read more
Eco Garden Maximizes Vegetable Garden Space

How to Effortlessly Maximize Your Vegetable Garden Space

How to Effortlessly Maximize Your Vegetable Garden Space 785 785 Eco Garden Systems

Do you want to start a vegetable garden, but don’t think you have the space? Maybe you live on a small city lot, in a condo or apartment, or have too much hardscape near your house to conveniently garden. There are many ways to garden that can work for you, and help you maximize your yield. Gardening in a small space can give you more produce than you would have ever imagined. Even if you have a lot of space, try these steps for maximum vegetable garden growing success! Container Garden: From planters to buckets to other small structures, a lot of people find the container method a great way to test out their green thumb. Containers can be quick and easy but can also limit the amount of produce you can grow in your vegetable garden. Raised Garden Bed: While you can grow food in just about anything, the best part about raised beds is that you control the soil, especially if you live in an area with soil that is hard to grow in (like clay or sand). You can purchase soil from the garden center and amend it with compost and natural fertilizers to make it even better. This is an easy and safe way to grow food. An Eco Garden System takes raised bed gardening to the next level by elevating it to a height where you don’t have to bend down. This makes it easy for anyone at any age to start a vegetable garden. It can be placed anywhere you want to grow food and is made of food-safe material instead of wood so that nothing can leach into your soil. Incorporate the Square Foot Gardening method: This method saves a lot more space than traditional row gardening, making it the perfect match for…

read more

Nature is Calling Us

Nature is Calling Us 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Trends come and go with each changing year. Gardening trends do the same with many different focuses on edible flowers to wall gardens to what to plant and not plant. The gardening world is no different than the fashion world with the “What’s hot, what’s not! However, one thing for sure never changes and that is the focus on nature and environment. One focus is loud and clear and that is how do we improve our environment? Each year there is a list of trending gardening ideas and the list for 2019 is not disappointing for the environment. There is one clear message in all the trends: We all can get out there and grow something green! It is possible!  Here are some remarkable trends predicted for 2019: Urban gardens Urban gardens are on the rise and should be. With all the possible products and devices out there to choose from everyone should grow something. Small place complaints don’t mean anything with the new and improved pots and raised garden beds available on the market. You do not need land to garden anymore. Small and middle size gardens are available and can be landscaped around or accessorized for aesthetic appeal. If you have acreage it does not mean you have to go big or go home! Pick a location and start small. Community gardens are a nice way to contribute as well. Restaurant gardens Who doesn’t want to eat at a restaurant that brags we grew it ourselves. The popularity of sitting among your food is on the rise just like the trendy restaurants that used to display meat as you walked in to ensure you knew right where your food was coming from. Rooftop gardens are popping up all over the world as the #farmtofork becomes a trademark. Growing…

read more

What To Do With All That Parsley?

What To Do With All That Parsley? 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

One of my favorite herbs to grow in the garden is parsley. Most people think of parsley as the useless garnish on the plate that gets thrown out after the meal is done. Why this may be true, parsley is a nice addition to any garden that adds beauty, fragrance, and flavor for certain dishes. If you plant parsley regularly in your garden you know there will be enough to share even with the beneficial bugs! I plant new parsley each year even though you can harvest and let it grow a second year. The second year growth will not have as much flavor but it will produce seeds that you can keep for up to three years and plant on your own the following years. Parsley is more than just a garnish! It contains high levels of flavonoids which makes it a powerful anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. Parsley can be used in soups, stews and casseroles. It has such a rich green color and strong aroma when harvested it is a no wonder it is heathy for you. Because it is in the same family as carrots and celery it can grow well into the fall season even with cooler temperatures. Planting just one plant in well drained moist soil will yield an ample supply of parsley that can be used fresh, dried, or frozen for future use. I even share some of my parsley with the caterpillars that eventually become pollinating butterflies. Why not, there is so much of it. I enjoyed using it fresh throughout the garden season making sure to harvest it when there were at least three branches on one stem. In past years I was cutting just the top part to use as a garnish and now know that if you use it for…

read more

Water and Your Garden

Water and Your Garden 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Water is essential for plants to grow. Good quality water is even more important if you want healthy plants and vegetables to thrive. There are many questions asked about the different filtered waters that people have in their homes when it comes to watering a garden. There are four water types: hard water, soft water, reverse osmosis, and of course good old Mother Nature’s rain water. If there was one to choose as the best for gardens, rain water would win hands down. However, we all know that relying on nature’s rain comes with a lot of inconsistency either in the form of drought or flooding, neither that is good for gardens. Hard water Hard water can be good for your plants. If you are using water from a well without a salt softener than that is consider hard water. Hard water contains minerals in the form of calcium and magnesium which can benefit your garden as long as there is not too much of it. Most of your fertilizers will contain these minerals to help growth and healthy foliage. If you notice stunted growth in your plants than you might want to check your soil to see if it test high for any of these minerals. I use hard water in my Eco garden systems and have notice in different locations that a white calcium build up will show up on top of the soil. No worries plants are healthy and soil is at a neutral pH level. Hard water can increase your alkaline level which means acidic loving plants may struggle. If the soil is to acidic plants can’t access nutrients very well. Hard water in an Eco Garden System White build up on top of soil from hard water Soft water Soft water is questionable and is…

read more

Crop Rotation and Raised Beds

Crop Rotation and Raised Beds 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Eco Garden Systems June 2017 Eco Garden Systems As I pull my summer crops to prepare for fall crops I am reminded about the importance of crop rotation. This usually is top priority in the spring when deciding if you should put a tomato plant where there was a tomato plant last year? Crop Rotation is an important part of gardening that will ensure success year after year in the same garden. The whole concept of rotating your plants is to help fight disease and nutrient deficiencies that can occur if you plant the same vegetable families in the same space. Understanding how to do this in a raised bed can be complicated due to the smaller area of gardening. There is actually some conflicting information about this because not every garden is the same and not every gardener gardens the same. After many years of gardening in an elevated self-watering garden this is my thoughts on rotating crops… I don’t really do it. I have planted tomatoes in the same spot for years and never had a real issue with the growth or with disease. I like to plant the taller vegetable plants to the North so that the smaller plants have all day sun. Because of this I usually end up putting tomatoes in the same spot. I do dig out some of the soil and replace with new soil and compost before re-planting for the next season. With raised beds this is an easy task. I had one tomato plant with hornworms and a lot of larvae in the soil. I was able to dig out all of them and it took care of the problem. I have planted beans in the same spot as well and have had no issues with production. Beans have always been…

read more

Two Sweet Petunias: Homemade Pesto

Two Sweet Petunias: Homemade Pesto 1170 1170 Eco Garden Systems

If you’ve been following along, you may recall me expressing skepticism as to what I was going to do with all the basil that is growing in our garden. You  then too probably recall the resulting laundry list of ways to use basil I received from my sister, the world traveller, cook and honorary family herbalist (yes it’s a real thing, no I didn’t know the term before I just googled it). I’m sure you’ve all been wondering what has become of said basil. Which is good because this post is about its fate. Answer: We made PESTO and it was delicious! We have three types of basil in the garden this year: regular (sweet) basil, lemon basil and purple basil. I will be the first one to admit that this was somewhat of a mistake as I do not like raw basil off the plant. At all. The purple is more bitter than the others, but to me all just taste bad raw. So the conundrum of what to do with it all plagued me. Pesto was one of the first items on the list. And it seemed simple enough. Here’s what I did: Detach leaves from stems and stuff leaves into a food processor. I used both sweet and purple basil. Process leaves on “chop” until a thick pulp forms Add spices. This batch contained: Minced garlic Coriander Sea salt A pinch of Paprika Process mixture on “puree” until blended You’ll notice two things. First, there are no measurements. Partly because the measurements depend on the amount of basil you have. Partly because I never measure spices. Second, there is no oil in this phase. Read on… The recipe above makes a concentrated pulp. Rather than committing to a single oil, I wanted to see how various oils worked with…

read more

Two Sweet Petunias: The Many Uses for Basil

Two Sweet Petunias: The Many Uses for Basil 768 1024 Eco Garden Systems

My sister has spent a lot of time working on farms throughout the world, and has developed quite the culinary green-thumb. As such, she was the logical “go to” for my question about what to do with all this basil. I knew there was only so much bruschetta with tomatoes, mozzarella and basil I could handle, and figured there had to be more ways to use it. “Assuming you mean fresh basil?” she asked. “Yes.” Well, “fresh” assuming I can figure out something to do with it before it dries up… Ask and you shall be overwhelmed! If you’re like me wondering “what am I going to do with all this basil,” read on. In fact, we might run out of fresh basil at this rate! Basil is a nice addition to any pasta/red sauce combo (tomato based) Basil pairs nicely with feta cheese (eg. greek salads) Make your own pesto! (which is nice as a spread, but also as a marinade on fish, eg salmon) there are endless variations on homemade pestos, and they are suuuuuuper easy to make Strawberry cucumber basil salad (perfect summer salad) Watermelon and basil is a nice combo (think skewers of this as an appetizer) Also nice with peach and peach-like fruit desserts, add a little fresh basil on top before baking Strawberry and basil is also a nice combo for some desserts – depends on the kind of basil you use though..ideally something on the mild side (eg mix it into strawberry shortcake biscuits) I’ve also heard of it in drinks, like lemonade (use honey as the sweetener – lemon honey basil, amazing). basil can add a nice mild peppery note Mix basil (or thyme or rosemary) into homemade bread and/or pizza dough Also fresh sliced basil on top of pizzas / breads…

read more

Two Sweet Petunias: Day 32

Two Sweet Petunias: Day 32 1024 768 Eco Garden Systems

Day 32: Getting Cozy I talked before about the plants getting “cozy” with each other. This week it’s like venturing into the jungle! Everyone is growing like mad, but despite the close quarters, all are healthy and seemingly happy. We harvested our first meal this week as well! A small (snack-sized) amount of broccoli, and from the herb garden some Romaine lettuce, sweet and red basil, dill and parsley. The dill will be great on fish and “dirty cabbage” (basically cooked cabbage with whatever I feel like putting with it), and the parsley is just going to garnish everything I eat (except maybe my oatmeal). I have yet to figure out what to do with all the basil though. I’ll probably “phone a friend” on this one…stay tuned! Day 32: Getting Cozy originally posted on Two Sweet Petunias, June 20, 2018. Follow along with Two Sweet Petunias this summer as they chronicle their family’s journey in year one of their Eco Garden.

read more

Our Partners

    Our System

    The original Eco Garden will transform the way you garden. Quick and simple to setup, sustainable, and efficient — this garden is for any level of gardener.

    Who We Are

    Started in 2016, Eco Garden Systems has a long history of gardening, gardening innovation and gardening for seniors.

    Privacy Preferences

    When you visit our website, it may store information through your browser from specific services, usually in the form of cookies. Here you can change your Privacy preferences. It is worth noting that blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience on our website and the services we are able to offer.

    Click to enable/disable Google Analytics tracking code.
    Click to enable/disable Google Fonts.
    Click to enable/disable Google Maps.
    Click to enable/disable video embeds.
    Our website uses cookies, mainly from 3rd party services. Define your Privacy Preferences and/or agree to our use of cookies.