vegetables

Vegetables in Basket on raised garden bed

15 of the Best Vegetables to Grow in an Elevated Garden Bed

15 of the Best Vegetables to Grow in an Elevated Garden Bed 800 600 Eco Garden Systems

Are you craving fresh grilled vegetables and crisp garden salads? Vegetable gardening season is upon us which means it’s almost time to enjoy all the good eating summer will bring. You don’t have to be a pro gardener to grow your own veggies. It’s easy to grow vegetables in an elevated garden bed like an Eco Garden Systems Original Garden. Here are the top 15 vegetables to grow in it: Tomatoes Peppers Lettuce Peas Beans Radish Arugula Broccoli Carrots Zucchini Beets Cucumber Cauliflower Kale Potatoes The Eco Garden is revolutionary in its approach to growing vegetables with a water reservoir and an Air Gap, which increases the oxygen in the roots of plants. Multiple studies have been done to measure the impact of increasing oxygen absorption in the roots of bearing plants and the impact that has on total fruit production. In the studies, tomatoes and peppers both had an increase in production, some by almost 60%! And the vitamin A and lycopene in the tomatoes increased. Brand new study results from Concordia University in St. Paul confirm these findings and more. You can’t go wrong growing peppers and tomatoes. Lettuce, arugula, and other greens grow quickly in an Eco Garden. Our beginner gardener, Jessica, started a variety of salad greens indoors this year and is happy to find she already has large heads of lettuce in just a few weeks. Radishes also grow quickly in an elevated garden bed. The Eco Garden is excellent at regulating both temperature and moisture, making it an ideal garden to succession plant. This way, you’ll get crops like lettuce and carrots all season long. This ideal environment also allows root crops to thrive, even though they usually don’t grow well in raised garden beds. Check out the fabulous growth garden blogger Frau Zinnie…

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Preparing Your Harvest Can Be as Simple as Growing It

Preparing Your Harvest Can Be as Simple as Growing It 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Who doesn’t want to eat better? We all have that nagging desire to exercise more and to add healthy choices to our diets. Every once in a while you hear people say it is too expensive to eat healthy. It can be expensive and choices are limited of where to buy fresh produce and not fork out a lot of money for it.  Farmers markets probably have the best choices when it comes to produce straight from the farm, but they can be pricey and in smaller towns can only appear on weekends. Supermarkets offer a wide variety but you have no idea where or how it was grown and now you have money into something that can potentially make you sick. If eating better is what you desire you definitely want to have complete control on what you are consuming. Farmers Market Supermarket One way to do that is to start your own garden. There are many different choices in gardening methods to get you started. One of the easiest is a raised garden bed that you fill with soil and plant. This type of garden will help you start as a beginner without a whole lot of work. Many of the raised garden beds out there come in different sizes that will fit wherever you may live. Self-watering features are a benefit because they can eliminate confusions over watering. One of the biggest mistakes in a garden is too much water or too little. Research your options and decide what works best for you. Considering how much time and effort you want to commit will help you in the long run maintain and keep a garden. Raised Garden Bed Whether you purchase or grow your own vegetables there is still the desire to prepare vegetables in different ways…

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Spring Time Planting

Spring Time Planting 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Spring is finally here and everyone is anxious to get the yard cleaned up and the garden planted. So anxious we sometimes start too early. If you have a ground garden it is optimal to wait till the ground warms to about 50 degrees or warmer. With 80 degree highs it seems only right to start planting. Just remember a good rule of thumb is to follow what zone you are in.  In southern Wisconsin we are zone 5 and are pretty safe to plant after Mother’s Day.  Check to see what is the last possible day for frost to occur and then plant after that date. Planting in the spring means planting vegetables that love cooler temperatures. Five early spring veggies you can plant now are: Peas There are a variety of peas that you can plant in the spring and then again in the fall. Snow peas, sugar snap peas and shell peas are cold weather plants and are best grown by direct sowing into the garden once the soil can be worked. Once you harvest, wait to late summer and plant again for an early fall harvest. It is recommended to sow 6 weeks before the last frost and that is only if your ground and soil is not frozen. Spinach Spinach loves cooler temperatures that stay below 75 degrees. Plant at least 12 to 15 seeds per foot of the row to ensure plenty of growth. Spinach loves well drained soil and nutrient rich soil. It can be planted in sunny or shaded locations. Lettuce Lettuce is one of the easiest vegetables to grow in the garden. There are many varieties of lettuce to choose from that can be sown directly into the garden or transplanted from a nursery purchase. I tend to plant lettuce in…

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The Love of a Potato

The Love of a Potato 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

If you are a potato lover you know that a home grown potato is a delicacy!  It is a treat to eat a potato straight from the garden.  My favorite is, without a doubt, the new potatoes harvested before they reach maturity.  Boil the baby potatoes, add fresh garden peas with a rich cream sauce, and you have heaven in a pot! Potatoes make for a hearty side dish with any meal especially if you are feeding hungry boys. I have two, and they are always hungry!  Potatoes are the go to dish that complete the feeding frenzy of severe hunger (so they say!) Growing my own potatoes has had some challenges through the years. I have tried many ways to solve issues with soil and insects.  From mounding to mulching to organic soaps, I have had some unsuccessful crops, which have included few potatoes to a wipe out of the plant leaves before they flower. This year I planted my potatoes in the elevated Eco garden System. Potatoes are one of the easiest vegetables to grow in the Eco Garden System.  After years of growing potatoes in the ground this system was the answer to the age old dilemma of potato bugs! In gardening conversations, many gardeners sigh when you mention theses pesky little destroyers, and some will say “Just move your plot!”  Well, I am at the top of hill now and nowhere to go! In comes the Eco Garden System and wow, a season without bugs!  The plants were beautiful, and the flowers were stunning. Best of all, no bugs! The Eco system has many of the ideal conditions for growing potatoes. Potatoes should be planted at least 2 weeks before your last frost.  Seed potatoes can be cut to the size of an egg with at…

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Copy of Grandma Laura's

Laura’s Garden

Laura’s Garden 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Don’s Italian grandmother was a heart of gold with a passion for cooking and gardening. Growing up in hard times it was easy to see why the older generation never took for granted the ability to grow food, which the younger generation today refers to it as a hobby.  Grandma Laura had an abundant variety growing in her garden and planted a garden every spring. It was large enough to ensure a healthy harvest for the summer and plenty of canned goods for the winter. She grew the basic garden variety: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, cucumbers, potatoes, strawberries, peas and beans. Because of her Italian heritage there was an endless supply of canned tomatoes and sauces. But the one dish that brings the most memories was a dish she made with her garden green beans. This green bean dish is still a request at meals from my own children simply called Great Grandma’s Bean Dish. The recipe is simple and I do believe the key ingredient needs to be FRESH, picked-from-the-garden green beans! Maybe the olive oil plays a part, but the garden-fresh beans are a delight. Add in onions, celery, and of course chopped garlic, and you have a gardener’s delicacy. To accommodate his grandmother’s ailing health and loss of mobility Don designed an elevated self-watering garden to help her garden through her later years. This made sure that the bean dish remained a staple on the dinner table. It just wouldn’t be grandmother’s recipe without the fresh garden beans. I remember the day he built her that garden and the look on her face, as well as the smile that never ended. Please enjoy Grandma Laura’s Green Bean dish! Grandma Laura’s Green Beans  4 cups fresh green beans or yellow wax beans 2 celery ribs chopped – approx.…

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WELCOME TO

Succession Planting in an Eco Garden System

Succession Planting in an Eco Garden System 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Follow one crop with another! Succession planting in the Eco Garden System is easy when you consider several different factors that will help you achieve a high yield on just about any vegetable you plant.  Succession planting is the ability to harvest and replant for continuous growth. Plan and Research Start by putting a plan together of what vegetables you want to plant for the garden season. Map out your garden using rows or square gardening methods or use the grids we provide on our website. Researching each vegetable you want to plant is important in order to determine the plants’ individual growth habits and climate preferences. There are vegetables that prefer cooler temps to those that thrive in hot weather. For example, peas and broccoli love cooler temperatures. Once summer sets in these plants can be pulled and heat tolerant varieties or heat loving vegetables can be planted in their place. Pick and sow  Succession planting of lettuce and radishes can be done throughout the garden season especially in an Eco Garden. The Eco Garden System maintains soil moisture and soil temperature allowing these crops to thrive all season. These vegetables have the shortest growing days and can be harvested and seeds planted right after. Because of the consistent moist soil, germination of the seeds during hot weather is easy to achieve. Most of your salad greens and carrot varieties work well with the pick and sow succession planting. Add nutrients between plantings When most of your spring plantings are done – such as peas, broccoli, spinach and beets – you can plant more varieties to harvest in the fall. If wanting a harvest of peas in the fall consider bush peas instead of the vine peas because they mature more quickly. Reading your seed packet will give you…

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elevated garden

Planting Your Eco Garden Gardening Bed

Planting Your Eco Garden Gardening Bed 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

[slider_gallery ids=”3245,3247,3252,3251,3248,3255,3244″] I think with anyone who starts or maintains a garden in the ground, the question each year is, should I try a raised garden bed this year?  Do they work and do they really eliminate the headache of weeding and watering?  Are they easy to build and how much time and money will I put in to them?  And, of course, the magic question, will they last? Well, the eco garden system self-watering bed is that one raised garden bed that can answer those questions and more when it comes to gardening in raised beds.  The Eco Garden will have less weeds and eliminate the worry of overwatering or underwatering.  The Eco Garden system gardening bed is easy to assemble and easy to plant.  Manufactured out of a high grade LDPE that is food-contact ready, it will last a long time through the years with very little wear and tear.  Once you have assembled your garden, the next important thing to do is find a great location for your garden. We recommend choosing a spot that gets at least 6 to 8 hours of sun.  When you decide where that spot is you need to think about how to level the ground for this type of garden.  The Eco garden has a reservoir tank at the bottom which holds water that should be level in order to maintain water consistently.  If you have a hard surface such as cement or gravel this works well to ensure that the garden does not sink over time or become uneven making it hard to maintain a consistent water level. Having a water source close is ideal because you will need to replenish the water about every two weeks.   Now that you have an ideal spot and your garden is set it is time to…

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Beneficial flowers

Beneficial Flowers for a Vegetable Garden

Beneficial Flowers for a Vegetable Garden 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

All flowers are beautiful! With the thousands of varieties that can be purchased it is hard to pick just a few; however, there are certain types of flowers that can be very beneficial to a vegetable garden.  There are many different types you can incorporate into your garden that are not only pretty, but repel insects, encourage pollination and are edible! When planting these flowers in a raised or elevated garden one thing you need to consider is space. Some of these flowers can multiply and expand, eventually over taking your garden; in raised and elevated beds try to plant dwarf varieties or bush varieties that won’t exceed a certain amount of room. Here are few of the most talked about vegetable garden flowers and why they are good companions in-ground or elevated gardens. Nasturtiums  Nasturtiums are an easy annual to grow with edible flowers and leaves. Nasturtiums have a peppery bloom that can be put in salads and added to other dishes. They are good companion plants to cucumbers, squash and broccoli. When planted next to these vegetables they will trap aphids and repel squash bugs. Nasturtiums add a colorful beauty to the garden, have a nice fragrance and come in bush and vine varieties. In raised beds, they work well on the edge of the garden growing out and over the garden bed. Marigolds Marigolds are another simple flower to grow and maintain. They are one of the most popular flowers to grow among your vegetables because they repel bad bugs and attract potential pollinators. Known for their strong fragrance, marigolds deters nematodes and the aroma confuses pests if planted in or around your vegetables. Because they are a bush annual they work well in raised beds without taking up much space. Marigolds are especially beneficial planted next…

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compost

Composting 101: Why good soil is vital

Composting 101: Why good soil is vital 950 631 Eco Garden Systems

Many say that good soil is the foundation of a healthy, productive garden. But not many may know that composting plays a large role in maintaining the vitality of a garden’s soil. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), compost is organic material that can be added to soil to help plants grow. Not only does making compost help keep materials – like food waste, which produces greenhouse gases – out of landfills, but it also adds nutrients to your soil that wouldn’t be found elsewhere.   The main benefits of composting include:   Enriched soil Moisture control, which suppresses plant diseases and pests Reduced dependency on chemical fertilizers Increased production of beneficial bacteria and fungi that create nutrient-filled soil Reduced methane emissions from landfills, which lowers your carbon footprint   Fortunately, there are many different ways to make a compost pile, whether its created indoors or outdoors, and some tools are beneficial to the process, including pitchforks, square-point shovels, machetes and a water hose. Once your compost is established, make sure you mix or turn it regularly.   For backyard composting, pick a dry, shady spot to store your compost bin or pile. If you have to keep your compost indoors or in your garage, be sure to purchase a composting bin available at most hardware stores.   What to include in your compost pile:   Browns – dead leaves Greens – vegetable and fruit waste and grass clippings Eggshells Fireplace ashes Coffee grounds Water   What to avoid adding to your compost pile:   Dairy products Fats, grease, lard or oils Yard trimmings laced with chemical pesticides Pet waste Coal or charcoal ash Meat or fish bones, and scraps Whether it’s kept outdoors or indoors, remember to keep a close eye on your compost pile and keep track…

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carrots1

Companion Planting: Find Your Plants Some Friends!

Companion Planting: Find Your Plants Some Friends! 440 627 Eco Garden Systems

  When it comes to planning your garden it is important to consider where you plant your vegetables and what you plant next to them because each vegetable is unique in structure and flavor. Competing for root space and above ground space or just keeping the bugs away are important to consider when planning your garden. With any garden experience, trial and error will give you an idea of what works and what does not. Three key points to companion planning in your garden are: Pest control Soil space and nutrients The cardinal points: north, south, east and west. Pest control is a big factor in any garden because most of your pests come from the plant itself or the soil you plant it in. Not all bugs are bad; however, some are extremely beneficial such as pollinators and predators. Walking out to your garden and seeing spider webs strung from plant to plant can be a welcoming sight; however, remain observant of these eight-legged guests as spiders do eat potentially bad bugs, but they can also eat their share of good bugs as well.  Planting companion plants next to each other can help deter a lot of the bad bugs. An example of this is decoy planting. Marigolds and Nasturtiums, which are edible, are good to plant between vegetables because they mask the smell of the vegetable plant, which in turn confuses the garden pests. They also repel pests such as nematodes and beetles. Root space and soil nutrients have a huge impact on what you plant and where you plant them. Heavy feeders such as cucumbers and cabbage should be planted next to light-feeding carrots so there is no competition for soil nutrients. Planting shallow-rooted vegetables next to deep-rooted ones will eliminate root competition, as well as planting…

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