ecogarden

Two Sweet Petunias: Day 4

Two Sweet Petunias: Day 4 1194 795 Eco Garden Systems

Day 4: Looking Green Quick update on the growth in our Eco Garden! The garden is looking so green and healthy. We had a sprout in the area where we planted the peas (from seed), but it turned out to be a false alarm because there were similar sprouts throughout the garden. Probably something in the soil or possibly from the trees in the area. But this “false alarm” doesn’t take away from how well everyone seems to be settling into their new home. Some of the tomatoes had flowers when we planted them, but no new flowers yet. The couple of “sad” looking brussel sprouts have come back though, their yellow leaves turning now a nice young green color. We planted six Marigolds around the perimeter of the garden today as well. This will help keep the critters away, and are also recommended “companions” for the Tomatoes and other plants. Day 4: Looking Green originally posted on Two Sweet Petunias, May 23, 2018. Follow along with Two Sweet Petunias this summer as they chronicle their family’s journey in year one of their Eco Garden.

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Two Sweet Petunias: Genesis of the Garden

Two Sweet Petunias: Genesis of the Garden 900 600 Eco Garden Systems

We bought a garden. Yes, that is a play on “We Bought a Zoo” and I realize it doesn’t have quite the same effect. What I should really say is “We bought Costco,” or “We bought the farmer’s market,” because – just wait – we’ll soon be growing in an abundance that puts places like these to shame. Ok, not really. But one of the goals with our new garden is to grow our own vegetables (and herbs and fruit) so that we don’t have to buy them at the store anymore. With the way our families go through produce, we might actually save enough to buy our Costco…but I digress. Simply put, we’re looking forward to being able to head out back to the garden to “shop” for our produce. So that explains “why” we bought a garden. I bet you’re wondering “what” we actually bought… We bought an Eco Garden (< look them up)! Yes, I’ll explain. The elevator pitch is that our Eco Garden is a raised container garden of mammoth proportion. But the longer, more technical version touting the many features and benefits reveals that it’s so much more than a “container.” Here you go: The container itself is 4-feet by 6-feet and stands 3-feet tall. That’s right, no having to kneel down or bend over to garden! This garden saves knees. It’s the bee’s knees (which, if bees actually have knees, they won’t be needing them because, again, no kneeling necessary in this garden). The garden uses advanced “air gap technology,” that helps aerate the plant’s roots. This is exactly what it sounds like – there is a “gap” filled with air in the container. Quick logistical note: The bottom of the container has a reservoir which is filled with water, and above this is a…

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Starting Your Seeds Indoors

Starting Your Seeds Indoors 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Lessons Learned There is so much information online about how to start your seeds indoors that it can be overwhelming to say the least. It took me a while to motivate myself to do it after realizing it can’t be that hard to do. The supplies needed are not that expensive or that extensive. Any of your garden catalogs or boxed stores will carry a line of indoor seed starting products from trays to lights. What is really needed to ensure success is a warm area and sterile potting mix to germinate your seeds. I decided to try a self-watering tray last year and found myself purchasing another system to try this year. (We are a self-watering garden business after all!) Like our self-watering garden, The Eco Garden System, the self-watering seed trays work just as well! There is less worry of overwatering or under watering which is crucial in seed germination. I also use the peat pots that can be planted directly into the garden once the hardening off process is done. Some tips and tricks I have learned from starting seeds indoors come from failures to complete and total success once they are transplanted and growing. Here are a few tips to keep in mind from a fairly green indoor gardener. Tip #1: Start out small until you get the hang of where the best spot is to begin. Planting trays and trays of seeds only to find out they do not have enough warmth or light is wasted time and frustration. Lesson learned, I have moved my seeds to a table in the basement where I have electric wall heat that keeps the table and seedlings warm and productive. It is also near a large sliding door for added light when needed. I did purchase a heat mat…

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Succession Planting in an Eco Garden System

Succession Planting in an Eco Garden System 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Follow one crop with another! Succession planting in the Eco Garden System is easy when you consider several different factors that will help you achieve a high yield on just about any vegetable you plant.  Succession planting is the ability to harvest and replant for continuous growth. Plan and Research Start by putting a plan together of what vegetables you want to plant for the garden season. Map out your garden using rows or square gardening methods or use the grids we provide on our website. Researching each vegetable you want to plant is important in order to determine the plants’ individual growth habits and climate preferences. There are vegetables that prefer cooler temps to those that thrive in hot weather. For example, peas and broccoli love cooler temperatures. Once summer sets in these plants can be pulled and heat tolerant varieties or heat loving vegetables can be planted in their place. Pick and sow  Succession planting of lettuce and radishes can be done throughout the garden season especially in an Eco Garden. The Eco Garden System maintains soil moisture and soil temperature allowing these crops to thrive all season. These vegetables have the shortest growing days and can be harvested and seeds planted right after. Because of the consistent moist soil, germination of the seeds during hot weather is easy to achieve. Most of your salad greens and carrot varieties work well with the pick and sow succession planting. Add nutrients between plantings When most of your spring plantings are done – such as peas, broccoli, spinach and beets – you can plant more varieties to harvest in the fall. If wanting a harvest of peas in the fall consider bush peas instead of the vine peas because they mature more quickly. Reading your seed packet will give you…

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