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Fall Gardening in the Eco Garden System

Fall Gardening in the Eco Garden System 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

It is that time of year where people find themselves saying “I am so happy I live where there are Octobers.” How true especially here in the Midwest where October brings so much fun and color. With the cooler nights and the shorter days, the turning colors of the foliage are not the only things changing. Your summer garden is starting to beg for a new beginning or to be put away for a long winter. The Eco Garden System’s gardening beds offer you the opportunity to plant a fall garden and with much ease. Even with the threat of frost around the corner, vegetables will thrive and grow well in the raised garden beds during fall. The end of August or the middle of September is a good time to start your fall vegetables. By that time there is something in the garden that needs to be harvested or just pulled because it is done producing. You can then add compost and replant your seeds; it is that easy in this system. Fall vegetables that do well in the cooler temps are spinach, broccoli, peas, carrots, radishes and lettuce varieties. Onions and green beans do very well from seed as well in this system. It is like summer gardening all over.   How is it so different than other raised beds or ground gardens? Well, the Eco Garden System is a self-watering, elevated garden that is made out of food-grade recyclable plastic. It is durable and can retain heat that is beneficial for a fall garden. It is also easy to add nutrients to the soil whether in the form of compost or a dry fertilizer. The water in the reservoir below will wick to the surface of the soil maintaining consistent moisture for your plant roots.  Attaching a…

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hornworms

It is Large and Green

It is Large and Green 480 270 Eco Garden Systems

It is Large and Green “What is that?!!!  There is something large and green on the tomato plant!” My daughter was in shock when I arrived to see that it was what I suspected…  A Hornworm!  There was not just one but several by the time we were done searching because if there is one there is a colony.  For the rest of the summer the search for these very large and interesting creatures became a sport in the hopes that she or one of her friends would find one of these slow moving terrifying monsters.  The word was out! The tomato hornworm is a non-beneficial insect in the garden.  It can be very destructive to a beautiful tomato plant in a matter of hours.  It is cleverly camouflaged which is why the discovery is so shocking.  They have a life cycle that starts with eggs that are laid on the leaves of the plant.  Keep in mind, if you buy a tomato or pepper plant at the greenhouse it may have the eggs already on it.  So, now you have brought it home. After that it goes thru 5 stages of larva growing from a small worm to a large and green caterpillar.  The scary one!  It is at this point you can take measures to get rid of them while they are on the plant. Picking them off by hand and throwing them in soapy water or just stepping on them will end the scary.  If they are left on the leaf they will eventually go beneath the soil and become a pupa where it will than emerge as a moth and then start all over again.  When you pull the tomato plant, tilling the soil where the plant was will help you discover the pupa to which…

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traditions

Gardening at the Espelien’s

Gardening at the Espelien’s 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

My father loved to garden. When I was a young boy he only grew ornamental plants in our small backyard in St. Paul, MN.  When we moved to the suburbs (better schools, closer to his job) he was able to designate a large piece of our backyard to growing fruits and vegetables.  The front and side yards got more of the ornamental – but the new layered produce garden got most of his attention. An engineer by training and trade (although he never finished his degree as pesky youngsters started arriving to crowd the little house on Wilder Ave.) he became meticulous in his planning.  The upper tier did not start all strawberries – but it soon became that due to the creeping nature of the plants.  We had June berries, mid-berries and late berries and the quality was always just okay – not sure if it was soil or he just could not wait to pick them (or perhaps we lost all of the good ones to the critters – maybe one day I will tell the woodchuck stories which are hilarious or the bunny stories which are sort of sad) but the berries never were the greatest.  Either were the odd things he would plant – broccoli, asparagus, Kohlrabi, etc. – not sure the ground was right and weather in Minnesota was always problematic – but the Kohlrabi was always a weird taste experience. Tomatoes – on the other hand – were a thing of beauty.  I remember when the entire middle level of the garden was tomatoes – almost too many varieties to count and all with his one garden hack: a coffee can with nail holes punched in the bottom.  You filled the can with water and the water would slowly drip out to keep the…

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JULY0145 copy

Eco Garden harvest has me saving green

Eco Garden harvest has me saving green 640 427 Eco Garden Systems

http://frauzinnie.blogspot.com/2017/08/eco-garden-harvest-has-me-saving-green.html

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Copy of Grandma Laura's

Laura’s Garden

Laura’s Garden 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Don’s Italian grandmother was a heart of gold with a passion for cooking and gardening. Growing up in hard times it was easy to see why the older generation never took for granted the ability to grow food, which the younger generation today refers to it as a hobby.  Grandma Laura had an abundant variety growing in her garden and planted a garden every spring. It was large enough to ensure a healthy harvest for the summer and plenty of canned goods for the winter. She grew the basic garden variety: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, cucumbers, potatoes, strawberries, peas and beans. Because of her Italian heritage there was an endless supply of canned tomatoes and sauces. But the one dish that brings the most memories was a dish she made with her garden green beans. This green bean dish is still a request at meals from my own children simply called Great Grandma’s Bean Dish. The recipe is simple and I do believe the key ingredient needs to be FRESH, picked-from-the-garden green beans! Maybe the olive oil plays a part, but the garden-fresh beans are a delight. Add in onions, celery, and of course chopped garlic, and you have a gardener’s delicacy. To accommodate his grandmother’s ailing health and loss of mobility Don designed an elevated self-watering garden to help her garden through her later years. This made sure that the bean dish remained a staple on the dinner table. It just wouldn’t be grandmother’s recipe without the fresh garden beans. I remember the day he built her that garden and the look on her face, as well as the smile that never ended. Please enjoy Grandma Laura’s Green Bean dish! Grandma Laura’s Green Beans  4 cups fresh green beans or yellow wax beans 2 celery ribs chopped – approx.…

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frau zinnie_lettuce_17_08

Mistress Zinnie, Quite Merry, How Does Your Eco Garden Grow?

Mistress Zinnie, Quite Merry, How Does Your Eco Garden Grow? 640 397 Eco Garden Systems

From one of our blog partners – Frau Zinnie! http://frauzinnie.blogspot.com/2017/06/mistress-zinnie-quite-merry-how-does.html

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WELCOME TO

Succession Planting in an Eco Garden System

Succession Planting in an Eco Garden System 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

Follow one crop with another! Succession planting in the Eco Garden System is easy when you consider several different factors that will help you achieve a high yield on just about any vegetable you plant.  Succession planting is the ability to harvest and replant for continuous growth. Plan and Research Start by putting a plan together of what vegetables you want to plant for the garden season. Map out your garden using rows or square gardening methods or use the grids we provide on our website. Researching each vegetable you want to plant is important in order to determine the plants’ individual growth habits and climate preferences. There are vegetables that prefer cooler temps to those that thrive in hot weather. For example, peas and broccoli love cooler temperatures. Once summer sets in these plants can be pulled and heat tolerant varieties or heat loving vegetables can be planted in their place. Pick and sow  Succession planting of lettuce and radishes can be done throughout the garden season especially in an Eco Garden. The Eco Garden System maintains soil moisture and soil temperature allowing these crops to thrive all season. These vegetables have the shortest growing days and can be harvested and seeds planted right after. Because of the consistent moist soil, germination of the seeds during hot weather is easy to achieve. Most of your salad greens and carrot varieties work well with the pick and sow succession planting. Add nutrients between plantings When most of your spring plantings are done – such as peas, broccoli, spinach and beets – you can plant more varieties to harvest in the fall. If wanting a harvest of peas in the fall consider bush peas instead of the vine peas because they mature more quickly. Reading your seed packet will give you…

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elevated garden

Planting Your Eco Garden Gardening Bed

Planting Your Eco Garden Gardening Bed 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

[slider_gallery ids=”3245,3247,3252,3251,3248,3255,3244″] I think with anyone who starts or maintains a garden in the ground, the question each year is, should I try a raised garden bed this year?  Do they work and do they really eliminate the headache of weeding and watering?  Are they easy to build and how much time and money will I put in to them?  And, of course, the magic question, will they last? Well, the eco garden system self-watering bed is that one raised garden bed that can answer those questions and more when it comes to gardening in raised beds.  The Eco Garden will have less weeds and eliminate the worry of overwatering or underwatering.  The Eco Garden system gardening bed is easy to assemble and easy to plant.  Manufactured out of a high grade LDPE that is food-contact ready, it will last a long time through the years with very little wear and tear.  Once you have assembled your garden, the next important thing to do is find a great location for your garden. We recommend choosing a spot that gets at least 6 to 8 hours of sun.  When you decide where that spot is you need to think about how to level the ground for this type of garden.  The Eco garden has a reservoir tank at the bottom which holds water that should be level in order to maintain water consistently.  If you have a hard surface such as cement or gravel this works well to ensure that the garden does not sink over time or become uneven making it hard to maintain a consistent water level. Having a water source close is ideal because you will need to replenish the water about every two weeks.   Now that you have an ideal spot and your garden is set it is time to…

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Beneficial flowers

Beneficial Flowers for a Vegetable Garden

Beneficial Flowers for a Vegetable Garden 560 315 Eco Garden Systems

All flowers are beautiful! With the thousands of varieties that can be purchased it is hard to pick just a few; however, there are certain types of flowers that can be very beneficial to a vegetable garden.  There are many different types you can incorporate into your garden that are not only pretty, but repel insects, encourage pollination and are edible! When planting these flowers in a raised or elevated garden one thing you need to consider is space. Some of these flowers can multiply and expand, eventually over taking your garden; in raised and elevated beds try to plant dwarf varieties or bush varieties that won’t exceed a certain amount of room. Here are few of the most talked about vegetable garden flowers and why they are good companions in-ground or elevated gardens. Nasturtiums  Nasturtiums are an easy annual to grow with edible flowers and leaves. Nasturtiums have a peppery bloom that can be put in salads and added to other dishes. They are good companion plants to cucumbers, squash and broccoli. When planted next to these vegetables they will trap aphids and repel squash bugs. Nasturtiums add a colorful beauty to the garden, have a nice fragrance and come in bush and vine varieties. In raised beds, they work well on the edge of the garden growing out and over the garden bed. Marigolds Marigolds are another simple flower to grow and maintain. They are one of the most popular flowers to grow among your vegetables because they repel bad bugs and attract potential pollinators. Known for their strong fragrance, marigolds deters nematodes and the aroma confuses pests if planted in or around your vegetables. Because they are a bush annual they work well in raised beds without taking up much space. Marigolds are especially beneficial planted next…

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compost

Composting 101: Why good soil is vital

Composting 101: Why good soil is vital 950 631 Eco Garden Systems

Many say that good soil is the foundation of a healthy, productive garden. But not many may know that composting plays a large role in maintaining the vitality of a garden’s soil. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), compost is organic material that can be added to soil to help plants grow. Not only does making compost help keep materials – like food waste, which produces greenhouse gases – out of landfills, but it also adds nutrients to your soil that wouldn’t be found elsewhere.   The main benefits of composting include:   Enriched soil Moisture control, which suppresses plant diseases and pests Reduced dependency on chemical fertilizers Increased production of beneficial bacteria and fungi that create nutrient-filled soil Reduced methane emissions from landfills, which lowers your carbon footprint   Fortunately, there are many different ways to make a compost pile, whether its created indoors or outdoors, and some tools are beneficial to the process, including pitchforks, square-point shovels, machetes and a water hose. Once your compost is established, make sure you mix or turn it regularly.   For backyard composting, pick a dry, shady spot to store your compost bin or pile. If you have to keep your compost indoors or in your garage, be sure to purchase a composting bin available at most hardware stores.   What to include in your compost pile:   Browns – dead leaves Greens – vegetable and fruit waste and grass clippings Eggshells Fireplace ashes Coffee grounds Water   What to avoid adding to your compost pile:   Dairy products Fats, grease, lard or oils Yard trimmings laced with chemical pesticides Pet waste Coal or charcoal ash Meat or fish bones, and scraps Whether it’s kept outdoors or indoors, remember to keep a close eye on your compost pile and keep track…

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    Our System

    The original Eco Garden will transform the way you garden. Quick and simple to setup, sustainable, and efficient — this garden is for any level of gardener.

    Who We Are

    Started in 2016, Eco Garden Systems has a long history of gardening, gardening innovation and gardening for seniors.

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